Check out Machine Gun Kelly, X Ambassadors & Bebe Rexha – Home (video)

Machine Gun Kelly, X Ambassadors & Bebe Rexha - Home

Machine Gun Kelly, X Ambassadors & Bebe Rexha – Home from the album Bright. amazon | Apple Music

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Check out Échame La Culpa by Luis Fonsi & Demi Lovato (video)

Échame La Culpa by Luis Fonsi & Demi Lovato
available at: amazon | Apple Music

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Check out GoldLink – Crew ft. Brent Faiyaz, Shy Glizzy (video)

GoldLink – Crew ft. Brent Faiyaz, Shy Glizzy

GoldLink’s “Crew” featuring Brent Faiyaz & Shy Glizzy. Available on:
Apple Music : amazon

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Slick Rick – Children’s Story

Slick Rick Music

Slick Rick – Children’s Story

Slick Rick Music

Slick Rick

Slick Rick foreshadowed and epitomized the pimpster attitude of many rappers during the late ’80s and early ’90s, with gold chains, his trademark eye-patch, and recordings that were no less misogynistic — “Treat Her Like a Prostitute,” for example, became an underground hit in 1988, though it was justly criticized for its view of women. His 1989 album, The Great Adventures of Slick Rick, was a certified-platinum classic, but before he could record a follow-up, Slick Rick was arrested for attempted murder. Out on bail thanks to Def Jam Records’ label head Russell Simmons, Rick recorded The Ruler’s Back in three weeks and released the album in 1991. After his release from prison two years later, he recorded Behind Bars for a 1994 release…  Read more

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Rebirth Of Slick (Cool Like Dat) by Digable Planets

Rebirth Of Slick (Cool Like Dat) by Digable Planets

Rebirth Of Slick (Cool Like Dat) by Digable Planets

Digable Planets

Rebirth Of Slick (Cool Like Dat) by Digable PlanetsThough they were not the first to synthesize jazz and hip-hop, Digable Planets epitomized the laid-back charm of jazz hipsters better than any group before or since. The trio’s 1993 debut album, Reachin’ (A New Refutation of Time and Space), was a mellow ride packed with samples from Art Blakey, Sonny Rollins, and Curtis Mayfield, and the single “Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat)” became a Top 20 pop hit. After earning a Grammy for Best New Duo or Group and embarking on an ambitious tour that included several live musicians, the Planets returned in late 1994 with their best album yet. Blowout Comb continued the group’s jazz-rap fusion, but also saw them branching out to embrace the old school sound of the street as well.

Digable Planets formed in the early ’90s, when Butterfly (b. Ishmael Butler, Brooklyn, NY) met Ladybug (b. Mary Ann Vieira, Silver Springs, MD) while attending college in Massachusetts. The two later hooked up with Doodlebug (b. Craig Irving, Philadelphia, PA), in Washington, D.C., and began recording. Their first single, “Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat),” released on the Pendulum subsidiary of Warner, hit the R&B Top Ten while their debut, Reachin’ (A New Refutation of Time and Space), was a critical and commercial success. Digable Planets’ resulting tour had a laid-back vibe more in keeping with a jazz show than any hip-hop concert, though the live musicians were criticized for doing little more than re-creating samples from the album. The trio solved that problem with the release of their second album, Blowout Comb, in late 1994. Much stronger than its predecessor, it used fewer samples and even included several solos. With no strong single to carry it, however, Blowout Comb’s sales performance was not up to that of Reachin’. After Blowout Comb, Digable Planets basically dissolved due to the dreaded “creative differences”. All three continued making music separately, but despite many promises that the recordings would become actual releases, nearly a decade passed before releases appeared from Butterfly’s Cherrywine project, Ladybug’s new billing Ladybug Mecca, and Doodlebug’s Cee Knowledge. Then, just a few weeks shy of the ten-year anniversary of Blowout Comb, the three announced that they had reunited to record their third Digable Planets album. A compilation, Beyond the Spectrum: The Creamy Spy Chronicles, filled the gap while fans waited for its release. ~ John Bush

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Rihanna – Sledgehammer (From The Motion Picture “Star Trek Beyond”) – Video

Rihanna - Sledgehammer Video

Sledgehammer (From “Star Trek Beyond”) – Rihanna

Rihanna established her dance-pop credentials in summer 2005 with her debut smash hit, “Pon de Replay,” and continued to demonstrate hit potential in subsequent years (“S.O.S.” in 2006; “Umbrella” in 2007; “Disturbia” in 2008). However, it was the singer’s third album, Good Girl Gone Bad, that made her a full-fledged international pop star with a regular presence atop the charts. Born Robyn Rihanna Fenty on February 20, 1988, in Saint Michael, Barbados, she exhibited a certain star quality as a young child, often winning beauty and talent contests. Because she lived on the fairly remote island of Barbados in the West Indies, however, she never foresaw the sort of stardom she would later attain.

That stardom came courtesy of a fateful meeting with Evan Rogers. The New Yorker was vacationing in Barbados with his wife, a native of the island, when he was introduced to Rihanna. Rogers had spent years producing pop hits for such superstars as *NSYNC, Christina Aguilera, Jessica Simpson, and Rod Stewart, and he offered the talented Rihanna a chance to record. Along with Rogers’ production partner, Carl Sturken (the other half of Syndicated Rhythm Productions), Rihanna recorded several demos that sparked the interest of the Carter Administration — that is, the newly appointed Def Jam president Shawn “Jay-Z” Carter. This led to an audition, and Rihanna both received and accepted an on-the-spot offer to sign with Def Jam.

Come summer 2005, Def Jam rolled out “Pon de Replay,” the lively leadoff single from Music of the Sun. Produced almost entirely by Rogers and Sturken, the song synthesized Caribbean rhythms with urban-pop songwriting. “Pon de Replay” caught fire almost immediately, climbing all the way to number two on the Billboard Hot 100 and contesting that summer’s reign of Mariah Carey’s “We Belong Together” atop the chart. The debut album spawned one other hit, “If It’s Lovin’ That You Want,” which also broke the Top 40. Rihanna’s follow-up effort, A Girl Like Me, saw even greater success and spawned three sizable singles: a chart-topper (“S.O.S.”) and two Top Ten hits (“Unfaithful,” “Break It Off”).

Rihanna’s third album, 2007’s Good Girl Gone Bad, continued her success while signaling a change of direction. Good Girl Gone Bad was a first-rate dance-pop album, stacked with several chart-topping singles and boasting collaborations with Jay-Z, Ne-Yo, Timbaland, and StarGate. The lead single, “Umbrella,” shot to number one, as did “Take a Bow” and “Disturbia.” Its success turned Rihanna into one of the planet’s biggest pop stars.

Rated R was released in 2009 during the wake of a physical altercation with romantic interest Chris Brown, who pleaded guilty to felony assault. The album’s lead single, “Russian Roulette” — written with Ne-Yo — was one of the year’s most controversial singles, and it set the tone for the singer’s new, dark direction. Rated R peaked within the Top Five of the Billboard 200, while another one of its singles, “Rude Boy,” topped the Hot 100. Rated R: Remixed was released in the spring of 2010 and featured ten tracks from the album revamped for the dancefloor by Chew Fu.

Loud, Rihanna’s fifth studio album, followed in November and was led by the StarGate-produced “Only Girl (In the World).” That song, as well as the follow-up singles “What’s My Name?” and “S&M,” all topped the Billboard Hot 100. In November 2011, shortly after Loud’s “Cheers (Drink to That)” entered the Top Ten, the singer released Talk That Talk. The single “We Found Love” with Calvin Harris earned the top spot in the Hot 100, and the album peaked at number three.

Unapologetic, Rihanna’s seventh studio album, featured some of her brashest material and was led by “Diamonds” — her 18th Top Ten single. Unapologetic became her first number one album, and eventually produced further Top Ten hits in “Stay” and “Jump.” By the fall of 2013, another record had fallen: her feature on Eminem’s “The Monster” helped it hit number one on the pop charts, tying her with Michael Jackson for the most chart-toppers in Billboard chart history. The song won a Grammy Award in the category of Best Rap/Sung Collaboration. In early 2015, Rihanna released “FourFiveSeconds,” a stripped-down single featuring the unlikely duo of Kanye West and Paul McCartney. It topped the Hot 100 and was followed by the cruder “Bitch Better Have My Money,” which led the way to Anti the following January. ~ Jason Birchmeier

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Travis Scott – Butterfly Effect (video)

Travis Scott - Butterfly Effect

Travis Scott – Butterfly Effect

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WizKid – Come Closer (Redux – Official Video) ft. Drake

wizkid closer video

WizKid – Come Closer (Redux – Official Video) ft. Drake

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Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley – Medication ft. Stephen Marley – watch

Damian Marley - Medication (feat. Stephen Marley)

About Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley

Damian Marley was only two when his father died, but the youngest of the Marley sons must have learned something. At the age of 13, he formed his first band, the Shepherds, which also included the son of Third World’s Cat Coore and the daughter of Freddie McGregor; the group even opened up the 1992 Reggae Sunsplash festival. By 1994, Damian was working on his own solo project, and with the help of his father’s label, Tuff Gong, he recorded Mr. Marley. Also lending a familial air to the sessions was the presence of Stephen Marley, who produced and co-wrote several songs for the LP. Halfway Tree from 2001 earned a Grammy nomination, but the public generally overlooked the ambitious album. Not so for the reggae-meets-hip-hop single “Welcome to Jamrock,” which became an urban phenomenon soon after its summer 2005 release. Street-level mixtapes began featuring it, urban radio couldn’t get enough of it, and remixes — both legal and not so legal — began appearing at a fast pace. The well-rounded album Welcome to Jamrock delivered on the promise of the single that same year, reaching the Top Ten. ~ John Bush

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Shakira – Me Enamoré (Official Video)

Shakira Music and Videos

About Shakira

After achieving superstardom throughout Latin America, Colombian-born Shakira became Latin pop’s biggest female crossover artist since Jennifer Lopez. Noted for her aggressive, rock-influenced approach, Shakira maintained an extraordinary degree of creative control over her music; she wrote or co-wrote nearly all of her own material, and in the process gained a reputation as one of Latin music’s most ambitiously poetic lyricists. When she released her first English material in late 2001, she became an instant pop sensation, thanks to her quirky poetic sense and a sexy video image built on her hip-shaking belly dance moves.

Shakira Mebarak (full name Shakira Isabel Mebarak Ripoll) was born February 2, 1977, in Barranquilla, Colombia, into a poor family. Her mother was a native Colombian and her father was of Lebanese descent, and so as a child Shakira soaked up music from both cultures; she also listened heavily to English-language rock & roll, listing her favorite bands in later interviews as Led Zeppelin, the Beatles, the Police, the Cure, and Nirvana. Shakira wrote her first song at age eight, began entering (and winning) talent competitions at age ten, and started learning the guitar at age 11 (one story runs that around this age, she was kicked out of her school choir for singing too forcefully). In 1990, at age 13, Shakira moved to Bogotá in hopes of pursuing a modeling career, but wound up signing a record deal with Sony’s Colombian division instead. Her 1991 debut album, Magia, comprised songs she’d written over the past five or six years, including some of her earliest efforts. Although it didn’t break internationally, the record started to make a name for her in her home country. Dissatisfied with the pop inclinations of the follow-up, 1993’s Peligro, Shakira changed direction for a time, joining the cast of the Colombian soap opera El Oasis in 1994.

When Shakira returned to recording in 1995, she asserted more control over the direction of her music and worked more rock & roll rhythms — as well as occasional Arabic tinges — into her Latin pop material. The first results were Pies Descalzos, which was initially released in 1995; a slow seller at first, the album gradually caught on thanks to “Estoy Aqui,” which became a hit all over Latin America, as well as Spain. After that breakthrough, Pies Descalzos just kept spinning off singles: “Dónde Estás Corazón?,” “Antología,” “Pienso en Ti,” “Un Poco de Amor,” “Se Quiere, Se Mata.” The album hit number one in eight different countries and eventually went platinum in the U.S. as well; Shakira toured for nearly two years promoting it (she finally left El Oasis in 1997).

Seeking to build on her success, Shakira signed Emilio Estefan — Gloria’s husband and a highly successful music-biz insider — as her manager and producer. The move paid off when her follow-up album, 1998’s Dónde Están los Ladrones? (Where Are the Thieves?), became an even bigger worldwide hit than its predecessor. What was more, it cracked the lucrative U.S. market wide open, spending 11 weeks at number one on Billboard’s Latin album chart and producing two U.S. number ones (on the Latin chart) with “Ciega, Sordomuda” and “Tu.” The album’s signature track, however, was the worldwide hit “Ojos Así,” her most explicit nod yet to the Arabic music she’d picked up from her father (not to mention its latent belly dancing connotations). Dónde Están los Ladrones? was also the most effective presentation yet of Shakira’s strong-willed persona; her self-analysis made her even more popular among female fans, while her anger over love gone wrong drew comparisons to Alanis Morissette.

When Gloria Estefan offered to translate “Ojos Así” into English, the prospect of a crossover suddenly seemed tangible, and Shakira decided that the most effective way to maintain control over her material was to learn English well enough to write in it herself. In the meantime, she set the stage for her crossover bid with a performance on MTV Unplugged, the channel’s first Spanish-language broadcast. MTV Unplugged was released as an album in early 2000, and topped the Latin charts for two weeks on its way to becoming her third straight platinum album; it also won a Grammy for Best Latin Pop Album. At the inaugural Latin Grammy Awards ceremony in 2000, Shakira delivered a much-discussed, show-stopping performance of “Ojos Así” and took home Unplugged-related trophies for Best Female Pop Vocal (“Ojos Así”) and Best Female Rock Vocal (“Octavo Dia”).

Mainstream pop stardom beckoned. Shakira dyed her long brown hair blonde, romanced Antonio de la Rua (son of the former president of Argentina), and went to work on her first (mostly) English-language album, Laundry Service. The single/video “Whenever, Wherever” was released in advance of the album in late 2001, and made her a star in the English-speaking world almost overnight. Laundry Service entered the American pop charts at number three, and “Whenever, Wherever” climbed into the Top Ten of the singles chart, peaking at number six. The follow-up, “Underneath Your Clothes,” also hit the Top Ten, halting at number nine; less than a year after its release, Laundry Service had gone triple platinum. Reviews of Laundry Service were divided as to the effectiveness of Shakira’s English lyrics, but nearly all agreed on her unique poetic imagery.

Extensive touring to support Laundry Service led to a long break for the singer, so a remix collection (2002’s Laundry Service: Washed and Dried) and a live album (2004’s Live & Off the Record) appeared in lieu of a new album. Revitalized, Shakira began the writing process for her next release and soon had 60 songs ready to go, some in English, some in Spanish; 20 of those songs were selected and divided up by language to make two different albums. Both appeared in 2005 and both hit the Top Ten, with the Spanish-language album Fijacion Oral, Vol. 1 leading the way in June with a number four placing and the English-language album, Oral Fixation, Vol. 2, following in November at number five. As sales of Oral Fixation began to slow in early 2006, Epic reissued the album in March with a bonus track, “Hips Don’t Lie.” The newly recorded song went on to top the Billboard Hot 100 chart in June, becoming one of the summer’s biggest hits and reviving sales of Oral Fixation, as well as Shakira’s entire back catalog.

Shakira signed a ten-year contract with Live Nation in 2008, prompting Forbes to deem her the fourth top-earning female musician in history. She also worked heavily on another album, traveling to multiple cities while collaborating with such producers as RedOne, Wyclef Jean, and Luis F. Ochoa. She Wolf was completed in 2009 and readied for release in October, marking her third English-language album. The electro-disco-heavy She Wolf didn’t make many commercial waves, performing well in Europe, Colombia, and Mexico but not in the U.S., yet Shakira quickly bounced back in 2010 with “Waka Waka (This Time for Africa),” the official song of the 2010 FIFA World Cup that became an international smash hit. On the heels of its success came Sale el Sol in the fall of 2010, an album largely recorded in Spanish that continued her remarkable worldwide success. A live album from Sale el Sol’s supporting tour, Shakira: Live from Paris, appeared in time for the 2011 Christmas season.

In 2012, Shakira replaced Christina Aguilera as a coach on the American hit musical talent show The Voice. She initially served for only one season, leaving in 2013, and after her departure she finalized her tenth album. Called Shakira, the record saw release in March 2014, preceded by the hit Rihanna duet “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Shakira also served on The Voice again for season six of the series. In 2016, she voiced the character Gazelle in the animated film Zootopia. The movie’s soundtrack generated a new Shakira single in “Try Everything,” a song co-written by Sia and Stargate. Early in 2017, Shakira appeared on “Deja Vu,” a hit single by Prince Royce. Prince Royce returned the favor by appearing on El Dorado, the album Shakira released in May of 2017. El Dorado was preceded by the single “Me Enamore” and featured appearances by Maluma, Carlos Vivas, and MAGIC! ~ Steve Huey

Shakira – iTunes

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